5 things I learned while running 10 miles with 0 training.

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K.. so my title might be a little “click-bait-y” but if it got ya here then Im not mad about it. So I wouldn’t say I had ZEROOO training for this 10 mile race but it was definitely not alot.

When I was pregnant with Hayes, I set a goal to run the Rocktoberfest 10 mile race. It was something that once I was cleared to workout- I could work towards. I always think its a good idea to set goals like that for myself (and for you also) so that you can actually have an obtainable result. I knew that I would be almost 6 months post partum and this race sounded like a GREAT idea…. at the time haha.

Luckily one of my best friends committed to doing it with me so I wasn’t alone (shoutout Jennifer!) Anyways.. long story short (kind of) I tweaked my hamstring a little when I was about a month away from the race so I pulled back from running so that it didn’t get worse. I got regular treatment for it (graston from a chiropractor, and a lot of pain from my trainer haha) but it seemed to be helping. I also was in the middle of the audition process for CycleBar Naples so I was spending and devoting a lot of my exercise time on the bike.

I thought about bailing MANY times… I knew I hadn’t properly trained for the amount of miles that this race required… but I didn’t bail. I had committed to myself for too long of a time to quit now- and to be honest.. I had shared with too many people that I was doing it to back out (this is the power of sharing your goals with other people.. you don’t want to let them down either.) So the day before the race… I signed up…

And I did it. I finished. Took me an hour and 43 minutes.. but I ran 10 miles… and I learned several things along the way:

  1. Leave your ego/competitiveness at the start line. I’ve let it be known that I am SUPER competitive.. but that wouldn’t have served me well in this particular situation. I had to shift my goal from “racing” the 10 miles.. to “finishing” the 10 miles. It’s hard for me… but I’m working on it.
  2. Having a friend to anchor me, but also to push me was SO important. So my bestie Jennifer who ran with me also had some aches/pains and minimal training but she was definitely my anchor. When those moments of competitiveness rose up in me she kept her pace steady which in turn kept me steady. If I didn’t have her by my side I would have crashed and burned by mile 5 because I would have pushed myself too hard. On the other hand though- at mile 9.5 these two girls (that we passed at mile 4) ran past us… and Jennifer looked back at me and said “are you going to let them beat you?” I was hurting pretty bad at this point and even responded “maybe!” but then I realized that Jennifer knew me so well that she knew how to push me to finish… and no.. I wasn’t going to let them beat me.. so we ran past them and crossed the finish line.
  3. Judgment doesn’t help you run faster. I hate admitting this one.. but again- its something I am working on.. and its not to judge others based on appearance. Ugh. the worst right? I know I’m not alone though… Just because someone doesn’t “look” like they’re a fast runner.. doesn’t mean they aren’t going to beat me. Also- just because someone DOES look like they’re a fast runner.. doesn’t make it true. Appearance literally means NOTHING. Just because someone has all the gear; the expensive running shoes.. the compression socks.. running hat etc- doesn’t mean they run a sub 7 mile. Just because someone is wearing a baggy t-shirt and gym shorts doesn’t mean they CANT run a sub 7 mile.
  4. LISTEN to your music. Let your music guide you… Dance. Have fun. SMILE. Having gone through my CycleBar auditions- its taught me to really listen to your music. Listen to how the beat changes.. let it be your guide. How many times have you had headphones in and you don’t even know what song just played because you were too busy listening to your own thoughts instead of the music? I really focused on listening to my music- and found myself smiling, snapping along to the beat, and dancing around. It kept the race so much more fun for me and was a much better distraction than my own thoughts.
  5. You can do hard things. Mindset is everything. We dont give ourselves enough credit for what we are able to accomplish. How you frame your thoughts about these hard things can be the difference. Around mile 7 when things started to hurt- I found my mind drifting to thoughts of “I have to stop.. this is too hard.. ” I changed my mindset to “I GET to do this.” That was powerful for me. I GET to run this race… I GET to run 10 miles. How many people aren’t able to say the same? How many people aren’t physically able to run? I decided to run for them.

Running isn’t my favorite. It never has been… but I keep coming back and doing races like this because of the things it teaches me. It challenges me in a way that other physical activities/workouts don’t do. I hope that you all continue to challenge yourself…push past your *perceived* limits and learn things about yourself that you didn’t realize.. like maybe how strong you are.. or how capable you are of those hard things.

What is something that maybe a race, or a workout has taught you? I’d love to hear!!!

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